Developing a Character

Take us to the bomb area Captain,” says Lucky.
“Has anyone looked at the videos Captain?” asked Jack.
“Yes, we see a young woman dressed in a hijab and an abaya, the
traditional dress of an Iraqi woman. She appears to be a black woman. She walks up to one of the tellers and seems to ask for the President of the bank. We see the cashier walk to the Presidents office. He leaves the office and walks to the glass partition to talk to the woman, and the bomb goes off. The woman disappears in the flash of the explosion, and the President is bounced over a desk and lands unconscious against the wall, twenty feet away from the blast area. The bullet proof wall saved his life; although he is in critical condition.”
“Can you see her trigger the bomb?” Jack ask.
“No, it is not visible from the view of the cameras,” says the Captain. The group arrives at the bomb Center, and Jazz cannot believe her
eyes. The devastation one person can make is overwhelming for her. She weeps seeing the body parts bagged on the bank floor. Human parts: brains, ears, legs, arms and hands; blood splattered on the ceiling, floor and walls mixed with dirt, plastic and metal. Jazz tells Jack she needs to step outside for some fresh air. Friends, relatives have raced to the bank to check on loved ones who work or use the bank. It has been a long day since the bombing, and the clean up is a slow process. Bagging and tagging to figure out what exactly happened at the bank. Jack walks out to check on Jazz,
“Are you, ok Honey?”

img_0001Hello 👋

How are my friends doing today? I would like some feedback on how my readers would like me to portray my main characters. Do the main characters need to be strong men or woman? Does it depend on the storyline, what the character evolves into? Can the hero show moments of weakness, sympathy, or can the person be cold and indifferent 😕?

As a writer of Police type adventure, I like to develop strong characters who show different emotions at different times. Joy, when their first child is born. Anger when his family is threaten. Bravery in time of crisis and an innate instinct for survival. In my book, The Man with a Limp, Lucky has the ability to work with people who is smarter than him. A computer person who solves problems Lucky cannot fathom an answer; he puts his trust in this person to find an answer.

An ex intelligence officer who becomes his best friend, who follows him through hell and back. A woman, beautiful, loving, as tough as Lucky is strong, and an FBI agent he meets during a case. Lucky falls in love and the agent and Lucky start a family. Sometimes Lucky is uncaring and ruthless in order to dispatch the most dangerous killers. Is this what you want in a hero? I am always open to new character development.

In my new book, The Chameleon Returns, Lucky McLaughlin continues to rescue people from evil criminals. He wishes to convict the killers legally; unlike his Father, who was more of an assassin to finish what the legal system would not conclude. Brooks McLaughlin would use any means at his disposal to finish the job. Brooks MacLaughlin was a genius in disguise, and frustrating to police and the FBI, because he left no evidence, no finger prints, shell casing, no skin fragments which the law enforcement could use against him.

Lucky worked at bringing law enforcement into each case and got to know the most important people in charge of each case. Lucky would ensure law enforcement is accredited for each solved case. He never asked for notoriety; He preferred to be on the sideline looking in. Is this the kind of hero you like to have an adventure with?

If you would like to read about Luck McLaughlin, click the link below:

Lucky

 

“Take us to the bomb area Captain,” says Lucky.
“Has anyone looked at the videos Captain?” asked Jack.
“Yes, we see a young woman dressed in a hijab and an abaya, the
traditional dress of an Iraqi woman. She appears to be a black woman. She walks up to one of the tellers and seems to ask for the President of the bank. We see the cashier walk to the Presidents office. He leaves the office and walks to the glass partition to talk to the woman, and the bomb goes off. The woman disappears in the flash of the explosion, and the President is bounced over a desk and lands unconscious against the wall, twenty feet away from the blast area. The bullet proof wall saved his life; although he is in critical condition.”
“Can you see her trigger the bomb?” Jack ask.
“No, it is not visible from the view of the cameras,” says the Captain. The group arrives at the bomb Center, and Jazz cannot believe her
eyes. The devastation one person can make is overwhelming for her. She weeps seeing the body parts bagged on the bank floor. Human parts: brains, ears, legs, arms and hands; blood splattered on the ceiling, floor and walls mixed with dirt, plastic and metal. Jazz tells Jack she needs to step outside for some fresh air. Friends, relatives have raced to the bank to check on loved ones who work or use the bank. It has been a long day since the bombing, and the clean up is a slow process. Bagging and tagging to figure out what exactly happened at the bank. Jack walks out to check on Jazz,
“Are you, ok Honey?”

 

 

Author: tmnugent

Poet Author. Living in Costa rica Pura Vida. Love to travel, play with my dogs and write poetry. My girlfriend and I enjoy life and could't be happier living here

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